Archive for the 'Healthy, Safer Families and Communities' Category

Together We Can Do Anything

By Elizabeth Saunders, Massachusetts Director – Follow our Boston office on Twitter (@CleanH2OMA)

Elizabeth and Her Sign

Elizabeth and Her Sign

The People’s Climate March was an incredibly powerful experience.  The Clean Water Action Boston team joined a bus organized by Alternatives for Community and Environment, the leading environmental justice organization in Boston, which organized dozens of youth leaders and others to travel together to the march.

The march was equal parts protest/call to action and celebration.  Of course it was a protest against the lack of commitment from our political leaders to doing the hard work and taking the firm stances that are needed to end climate change.  And of course it was a call to action to United States and world leaders to do that work and take those stances this week in the UN Climate Summit.

But equally importantly, it was a celebration of the coming together of more than 400,000 people from across the country, a celebration of the creativity, energy and hard work of those individuals, and a celebration of unity.  As we keep our noses to the grindstone, day in and day out, fighting the battles in our corners of the country, it can be too easy to forget that we are part of a huge movement of passionate people.  At the People’s Climate March, that was impossible to forget. Read the rest of this entry »

An Amazing Day and Thanks to All

By Amy Goldsmith, New Jersey Director

Amy Goldsmith

Amy Goldsmith

Thanks to all who went to the People’s Climate March.

It was a day full of awesome energy. There was wonderful drumming by the Montclair canvass staff plus our very own Campaign Director David Pringle and Long Branch Canvass Director Ben Davies. We raised our voices and beat our drums with more than 400,000 people in New York and thousands upon thousands from around the world.

Like Bob said, it was a mind-blowing experience.

But the March was not an end. We have work to do.

So let’s keep the people power going as we fight for what is right…clean water, clean air, safe energy and healthy neighborhoods. Let’s recruit others to join us so we can do even more. We want to win. We need to win. Read the rest of this entry »

Supercharged Streets in New York

By Melissa Everett, Connecticut Clean Energy Program Manager

The streets of New York were supercharged yesterday at the People’s Climate March, not only by the sheer numbers but with the inventiveness of the communication that came up from the throng of well over 300,000. Posters, shirts, large puppets, and larger pop-up sunbursts – all the handmade expressions that citizens without advertising budgets can muster when they are highly motivated. And this was a highly motivated group indeed. Popular around me was the call-and-response chant:

Tell me what democracy looks like.

This is what democracy looks like.

Sponsored by over 1200 organizations including Clean Water Action, the march was timed to set the stage for the UN working meetings beginning Tuesday, which formulate the agenda for the Paris meetings a few months ahead. Participants were organized in waves to represent all the constituencies whose voices must be heard, from indigenous communities and vulnerable populations to solution-generators like the clean energy and clean water economic sectors. Bringing those voices together to call for decisive international agreements and national policy shifts — that is democracy at its best. Read the rest of this entry »

Americans Speak on Clean Water (Part 2)

By Phil Dimotsis, Organizer. Follow Phil on Twitter (@PhiluptuousD)

Yesterday I shared with you just a few of the passionate words that people from across the nation had to say about the fight to protect clean water. There were too many, and too many good letters, not to share more. Read the rest of this entry »

Congress’ Dirty Water Caucus: How do we combat stupid?

by Jonathan A. Scott, on Twitter @jscottnh

Following Tuesday’s US House vote to pass the ROPA Dirty Water bill (HR 5078, approved 262-152) we published this infographic on Clean Water Action’s Twitter and Facebook accounts:

ROPA graph postWe also published a link to information on how individual House Members voted (https://www.govtrack.us/congress/votes/113-2014/h489)

One concerned/angry Clean Water Action supporter on Facebook commented, “How do we combat stupid.” Read the rest of this entry »

Clean vs Dirty: why won’t the US House get it?

By Jonathan A. Scott, follow Jon on Twitter – @jscottnh

Today the U.S. House is engaged in all-out debate on the merits of yet another bad bill that is all too likely to pass along party lines. Backed by a long list of outfits I sure wouldn’t trust to protect my water (Big Ag, Dirty Coal, the Fertilizer Institute, National Mining Assoc. & the American Petroleum Institute, the National Pork Producers Council, the International Council of Shopping Centers, National Cattleman’s Beef Association, the Treated Wood Council and of course the US Chamber of Commerce and the Farm Bureau (chosen by polluters as the public face for this dirty water campaign), this House bill would block EPA from protecting our water, including drinking water sources for 1 in 3 Americans.

When Dirty Water measures like this prevail everybody loses except for an elite few. That’s why we sometimes say “We Can’t All Live Downstream.” Read the rest of this entry »

Organizing for Clean Water

By Paula Weiner, Pittsburgh Phone Organizer
Legacy. That’s what first attracted me me to apply for a job with Clean Water Action.  While aiding others in the choice between a blue scarf and a purple one is important in its own way, I am finding that the ability to leave a lasting difference on our beleaguered planet is more rewarding than I could ever have imagined.  Being a canvasser is not an easy job,  especially when you consider what Clean Water Action is up against.
The people and companies responsible some of the most horrendous acts damaging the earth are well funded and deeply connected, so when I pick up the phone at Clean Water Action, one of my goals is to broaden the base of Earth’s stewards.
Our members run the gamut from school teachers and scientists, to students and nuclear-power-plant employees and everything in between. The most important thing is the care we all have for our solitary planet. Water is the most basic, fundamental necessity we have and I don’t know why it is so scary for the companies that wage war against us. No wait, I do know why: GREED.  That’s the bottom line sometimes, greed.

Read the rest of this entry »

Add Shallow Drinking Water to Fracker’s List of Favorite Things

By John Noël, National Oil and Gas Program Coordinator – follow John on Twitter

On the heels of a groundbreaking report on the oil and gas industry’s continued use of diesel fuel in its fracture fluid, comes another bombshell from two Stanford researchers in Wyoming. An LA Times exclusive indicates the researchers are completing a study in two geologic formations in the much heralded, Pavilion gas field. The results reveal that drillers were fracking IN formations containing underground sources of drinking water. IN being the key word.

Ever since the fracking saga broke into the mainstream, industry has continuously dismissed the public’s concern about the actual fracturing process on our sources of drinking water. They claimed that it is happening far below the surface with no chance of harming the pristine aquifers above. While lots of fracking does occur thousands of feet below the surface and under low permeability capstone rocks, this new research confirms that there are cases of fracking happening at incredible shallow depths of as little as 700-750ft. Which is far shallower than the “…four Empire State buildings stacked on top of each other (“approximately 6000 ft”) claimed by API – and wouldn’t even get you to the observation deck of the actual Empire State Building. Read the rest of this entry »

ReThinking Disposables

By Madison Davis, California Waste Program Intern

Since starting my summer internship at Clean Water Action in Oakland, I’ve discovered how little I really knew about how disposable containers’ impact our environment. Of course as a life long environmentalist, I’ve always tried to do what I could to limit my impact on our precious resources. Using reusable bottles over disposable ones has always been a given for me, but other disposable containers weren’t completely out of the question before I started working at Clean Water Action. For some reason our society has yet to recognize that single use products, such as fro-yo cups, to go containers or disposables offered at restaurants for dinning in, are just as bad for the environment as coffee cups. Read the rest of this entry »

Let’s #kickcoalash out of our communities

By Jennifer Peters, National Water Campaigns Coordinator. Follow Jennifer on Twitter – @EarthAvenger

Join us for a coal ash week of social media action, August 4th – August 8th.

Next week marks six months since Duke Energy’s coal ash spill, which dumped more than 39,000 tons of toxic ash and 27 million gallons of contaminated wastewater into the Dan River, the source of drinking water for thousands of Virginians living downstream.  Activists from around the country will be highlighting this by using social media, letters to the editor, and blogs (even here!) to urge the Environmental Protection Agency and the White House to finalize safeguards to better protect public health and the environment from this harmful waste. Read the rest of this entry »

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